Free Google Analytics Plug-In for Microsoft Excel (GA Client/Add-On for Spreadsheets)

August 5th, 2009 by Lars Johansson


Have you heard about the free, open source, Microsoft Excel plug-in for Google Analytics? It was released in June, and so far the project has generated 10,000 visits from 8,000 unique browsers, 2,000 downloads, 1,300 inlinks from blogs and websites, and countless tweets.

Google Analytics plug-in for Excel

Excellent Analytics is an Excel add-on that allows you to define data queries and embed them into Microsoft Excel. Simply go to the Excellent Analytics menu in Excel and use the wizard interface to add a report query to your spreadsheet. It can be used to correlate variables and track them over time. You can also add external data to Google Analytics reports to get a more complete view of how your business is performing.

No longer do you have to use Omniture SiteCatalyst, HBX, or WebTrends to get a web analytics Excel client. Forget about awkward exports from the GA interface. No more exporting! Import and refresh your data from within Microsoft Excel instead! Then you can easily sort, manipulate, and distribute your data to anyone using Excel.

Excellent Analytics is 100% free to download and use. If you’re a programmer and passionate about analytics, you can even sign up to help improve the plug-in since it’s open source.

If you’ve already used Excellent Analytics, make sure you have the latest version. An important update has been released since the plug-in was first introduced.

Requirements to use the plug-in:

  • Microsoft Excel 2007
  • Windows XP or Vista

Using Excellent Analytics is easy. Just download Excellent Analytics.rar, extract the contents using a program such as 7-Zip, and run Setup.exe. Follow the on-screen instructions.

If you’re running an old version of Excellent Analytics and would like to upgrade, you need to remove the old installation and make a clean install.

Once installation has completed, you should be able to find the Excellent Analytics menu in Excel.

Excellent Analytics menu in Excel -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

The first thing you need to do is to click “Account.”

Logging in to Excellent Analytics in Excel -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

The credentials (the e-mail address and password you use when you log in to Google Analytics) that you enter will be sent to only Google so that your Google Analytics data can be accessed. Your credentials are not stored or shared in another way.

Once you have successfully logged in, click “New Query.” This will open the Excellent Analytics window where you will be able to select the Google Analytics data you wish to pull into Excel.

Select dimensions in Excellent Analytics  -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

The first thing you need to do is to select which dimensions to include.

Select dimensions in Excellent Analytics  -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

If you tick a box, you’ll select everything included in that level. For instance, if you tick the “Content” box, “exit page path,” “landing page path,” “page path,” and “page title” will all be selected. If you wish to select only one of them, you need to expand that level and tick only the box in front of the dimension you wish to add.

Select metrics in Excellent Analytics  -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

Selecting metrics works the same way as selecting dimensions. Tick an entire level, or simply tick the metrics of your choice.

Select metrics in Excellent Analytics  -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

An example showing the available campaign metrics. No metrics have been chosen yet in this example.

To find out which combinations of dimensions and metrics are valid, check the official list.

The final step to consider before running your query is whether you want to filter which data should be included.

Create a filter in Excellent Analytics  -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

OK, this example is a bit silly, but if you are familiar with the way filters usually work in other programs, I know you’ll get the point.

If you have selected the date range you’re interested in, you’re now ready to push the “Execute” button, and watch the magic happen.

If you’d like to run your query again using a different date range, simply mark the top row of the table generated by the query (in this case it’s row 1), and click “Update Query.” Please note that a spreadsheet may contain multiple queries and that you need to mark the heading of that particular table. It contains the name of the selected Google Analytics profile and the selected date range.

Refreshing a query in Excellent Analytics -- The Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel

That’s it. Pretty cool, huh?

Well, now we need your help. Excellent Analytics is open source, meaning its continuous development depends on all of us.

There are three ways in which you can contribute:

#1. Become a developer.

#2. Submit your Excel dashboards based on Excellent Analytics (send a link to where we can download them from, or contact us and we’ll let you know of alternative methods for submission)

#3. Submit your suggestions of functionality that could be added or changes you’d like to see made

Excellent Analytics is a project initiated by Mark Red. Anyone is, however, welcome to join. It doesn’t matter if you are independent or part of a different agency.

Download the free Google Analytics plug-in for Microsoft Excel 2007 for Windows XP/Vista



Share on LinkedIn

Posted in Author Lars Johansson, From WebAnalysts.Info, Google Analytics | 24 Comments »




Comments

  1. Free Google Analytics Plug-In for Microsoft Excel (GA Client/Add …- SFWEBDESIGN.com Says:

    [...] Free Google Analytics Plug-In for Microsoft Excel (GA Client/Add … Tags: 1300-inlinks, analytics, Google Analytics, microsoft, microsoft-excel, open-source, [...]

  2. Free Google Analytics Plug-In for Microsoft Excel (GA Client/Add … | Search Engine Optimization Says:

    [...] Free Google Analytics Plug-In for Microsoft Excel (GA Client/Add … Bookmark [...]

  3. Importante es saber por dónde llegan los usuarios, pero igual de importante es saber por dónde se van | WebAnalytics.ES Says:

    [...] de Google Analytics, fácilmente desde Excel, algo que siempre se presenta como una gran aventura: Free Google Analytics Plug-In Microsoft Excel (GA Client/Add-On for Spreadsheets) en [...]

  4. Web Analytics World Says:

    Let’s say you suspect that your website does not display properly in some web browsers, potentially causing visitors to leave. Well, let’s use Excellent Analytics to find out if your hunch is correct [..]

    Keep reading:
    http://www.webanalyticsworld.net/2009/08/analyze-google-analytics-data-without.html

  5. Analyze Google Analytics Data Without a Web Browser (Use Excel Instead) | Weight Watch Says:

    [...] If you’re not a programmer/developer and would like to contribute you can always post your comments about improvements that you’d like to see made. [...]

  6. eCommerce Share » Analytics Data In Excel Through Our API Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this plugin. Excellent Analytic’s Query Builder [...]

  7. Analytics Data In Excel Through Our API - Google Stuff Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this plugin.Excellent Analytic's Query Builder InterfaceShufflePoint – Works somewhat [...]

  8. Analytics Data In Excel Through Our API | Srinivas Katam - Internet Marketing Specialist Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this plugin. Excellent [...]

  9. Google Analytics Blog Says:

    Many of our clients use Excel to manage their ad campaigns, visualize marketing performance, and perform complex data analysis. Most analysts use the Google Analytics Export feature to manually export their report data to CSV files. Then they import the CSV file into Excel. No longer! Now, with the Google Analytics API you can bypass this manual step and export Google Analytics data directly from within Excel! Once you’ve set it up, there’s no need to visit the Analytics reports to view data in Excel.

    Thanks to a variety of developers, here are four solutions that can transform you from a reporting monkey to an analysis ninja (as Avinash would say)[..]

  10. Analytics Data In Excel Through Our API Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this plugin. Excellent Analytic’s Query Builder [...]

  11. Google Products » Blog Archive » Analytics Data In Excel Through Our API Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this plugin. Excellent Analytic’s Query Builder [...]

  12. Getting my geek on with Google analytics built right into Excel | DougKneeland.com Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this [...]

  13. Dit is gaaf! » Excellent Analytics Tutorial » Nice to Know Says:

    [...] Via: WebAnalytics.Info Stem of voeg toe aan: // [...]

  14. Связка Google Analytics и Excel: новые возможности- Веб-Аналитика Says:

    [...] самым экономным аналитикам. На Webanalytics.info есть подробная инструкция по использованию [...]

  15. All About Google » Analytics Data In Excel Through Our API Says:

    [...] Google Analytics queries and pull data right into Excel. Webanalytics.info put together a great step by step tutorial to get started using this plugin. Excellent Analytic’s Query Builder [...]

  16. Chris Stahl Says:

    Is it possible in the next build to add in the other goals metrics?

    Additionally, the API doesn’t require a dimension in order to make a query. It does require a metric but you can get a query for things like ga:visits without needing a dimension. Can that functionality be added as well?

  17. Lars Johansson Says:

    Chris,

    Our lead developer is working on those things. :)

  18. Milco Landtman Says:

    Thanks very much for this initiative. I will soon start using the plugin once I have Excel 2007 on my computer. Since I work on automating reports, I would be happy with the following things:

    - The possibility to take the report date ranges from Excel cells

    - Possibility to refresh all requests on a worksheet simultaneously (like HBX Report Builder)

    Please continue with this great project!

    - Milco

  19. Danielo Says:

    How can I get metrics for a specific goal? It makes no sense to get them all at once.

    With this done the tool would be awesome

  20. Lars Says:

    Danielo – next release!

    Milco – those are planned!

  21. Mark Says:

    Is there a simpler way to reuse excel spreadsheets that have already been created using this plugin? For example, the following month I open the spreadsheet and would like to change just the date and click execute (to get new data for the same criteria). But I find instead that I have to enter in ALL of the criteria again because the fields are empty. Any thoughts? Thank you.

  22. Lars Johansson Says:

    Mark, this is what you do to update a query:

    * Mark the cell containing the query (starting with the name of your GA profile)
    * Click “Update Query” in the EA menu bar in Excel
    * Change the date range and click execute

    There will be a function for updating all queries in an upcoming version, but for now you have to update the date range for each query manually.

  23. Lowell Herr Says:

    Is there a limited number of times per day one can request a new query? When I run a request, the Excel worksheet remains empty. All was working moments ago, but now after running a few requests, it no longer is working.

    Lowell Herr

  24. Lars Johansson Says:

    There is a quota policy for the GA API, but I’d be surprised if you’re hitting the limit.

    Read about it here:
    http://code.google.com/apis/analytics/docs/gdata/gdataDeveloperGuide.html#quota

    In short (quote):

    10,000 requests per 24 hours per web property (i.e., all the profiles/table IDs within one web property). This quota is replenished every midnight, Pacific Time.

    10 requests in any given 1-second period (10 qps) per IP address across all Data Export API queries

    4 concurrent requests at any given time per IP address (i.e., you must wait until your 1st request completes before making a 5th request)

    10 requests in any given 1-second period (10 qps) per IP address across all Data Export API queries.

    What version of Windows and Excel are you using? If you’re using XP, check Windows Updates if you have any pending updates.